One of the world's classic airliners, the Boeing 727 was built to carry on the successful legacy of its forerunner, the 707. With a low-altitude, high-speed cruising capability, it provided economic jet travel on short- and medium-range routes and was able to serve smaller airports. Its production run extended from 1963 to 1984, producing a total of 1,832 units that were flown by more than 100 different airlines. It was the world's best-selling passenger jet in its time, until it was surpassed by the next generation of airliners, the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320.

The 727 is instantly recognizable by its tail-mounted, tri-jet configuration. The key to its short runway performance was its innovative high-lift system of triple-slotted trailing edge flaps, outboard leading edge slats, and inboard leading-edge Krueger flaps. The 727 was the first Boeing jetliner to undergo now-standard fatigue testing, the first to have completely hydraulically powered flight controls, and the first to incorporate an auxiliary power unit (APU) to provide ground power at remote locations. The initial 727-100 model was superseded by the stretched 727-200 in 1965.

Another characteristic 727 feature is its hydraulically actuated aft air-stairs. Although intended for ground use only, this portal entered local aviation lore when hijacker D. B. Cooper used it to parachute out of a Northwest Airlines 727 on November 24, 1971.

The Museum's airplane was the first 727 ever produced. Following the conclusion of Boeing's flight-test program in 1964, it entered regular passenger service with United Airlines. For its donation to the Museum in 1991, UAL repainted the historic aircraft in its original delivery colors. On March 2, 2016, this aircraft made one last flight from the Museum's Restoration Center at Paine Field in Everett, Washington to Boeing Field, where it moved into permanent display in the Aviation Pavilion in the fall of 2016.

Serial Number:
18293
Registration:
N7001U
Wingspan:
108.00ft
Length:
133ft
Height:
34ft
Wing Area:
1 650.00ft²
Empty Weight:
80,602lbs
Gross Weight:
160,000lbs
Maximum Speed:
632mph
Cruise Speed:
596mph
Power Plant:
Three Pratt & Whitney JT8D-1 engines
Range:
3,430miles

360˚ Panoramas

Cockpit

Matterport 3D Tour

Boeing 727 Matterport 3D Tour

One of the world's classic airliners, the Boeing 727 was built to carry on the successful legacy of its forerunner, the 707. With a low-altitude, high-speed cruising capability, it provided economic jet travel on short- and medium-range routes and was able to serve smaller airports. Its production run extended from 1963 to 1984, producing a total of 1,832 units that were flown by more than 100 different airlines. It was the world's best-selling passenger jet in its time, until it was surpassed by the next generation of airliners, the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320.

The 727 is instantly recognizable by its tail-mounted, tri-jet configuration. The key to its short runway performance was its innovative high-lift system of triple-slotted trailing edge flaps, outboard leading edge slats, and inboard leading-edge Krueger flaps. The 727 was the first Boeing jetliner to undergo now-standard fatigue testing, the first to have completely hydraulically powered flight controls, and the first to incorporate an auxiliary power unit (APU) to provide ground power at remote locations. The initial 727-100 model was superseded by the stretched 727-200 in 1965.

Another characteristic 727 feature is its hydraulically actuated aft air-stairs. Although intended for ground use only, this portal entered local aviation lore when hijacker D. B. Cooper used it to parachute out of a Northwest Airlines 727 on November 24, 1971.

The Museum's airplane was the first 727 ever produced. Following the conclusion of Boeing's flight-test program in 1964, it entered regular passenger service with United Airlines. For its donation to the Museum in 1991, UAL repainted the historic aircraft in its original delivery colors. On March 2, 2016, this aircraft made one last flight from the Museum's Restoration Center at Paine Field in Everett, Washington to Boeing Field, where it moved into permanent display in the Aviation Pavilion in the fall of 2016.

Serial Number:
18293
Registration:
N7001U
Wingspan:
108.00ft
Length:
133ft
Height:
34ft
Wing Area:
1 650.00ft²
Empty Weight:
80,602lbs
Gross Weight:
160,000lbs
Maximum Speed:
632mph
Cruise Speed:
596mph
Power Plant:
Three Pratt & Whitney JT8D-1 engines
Range:
3,430miles

360˚ Panoramas

Cockpit

Matterport 3D Tour

Boeing 727 Matterport 3D Tour