The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star series was the first American jet fighter to see combat and exceed 500 mph. Design studies began in early 1943, and Kelly Johnson's team produced a prototype only 143 days later. Engine development in this pioneering, wartime era of jet propulsion delayed first flight of the prototype to January 8, 1944. Numerous technical issues with the airframe and powerplant had to be resolved in the ensuing flight test program.

Plans to deploy P-80s to the Pacific were canceled when the war ended, but the type still became the early frontline jet fighter of the U.S. Air Force in the late 1940s and at the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950. Now designated F-80, it scored the first aerial combat victory by an American jet fighter on June 27, 1950 and the first victory in a jet-to-jet dogfight against a North Korean MiG-15 on November 7, 1950. However, the Shooting Star was generally outclassed by the new MiG and quickly shifted to fighter-bomber missions. A total of 1,732 of these important jets were produced between 1943 and 1950.

In 1947, due to the slow delivery of its own new jet fighters and in order to train new jet pilots, the U.S. Navy obtained the transfer of 50 Lockheed P-80Cs destined to the Air Force. Designated originally as TO-1 and changed to TV-1 in 1950, these planes served as land-based trainer aircraft for Navy squadron VF-52 and U.S. Marine Corps squadron VMF-311. With the arrival of the delayed Grumman F9F and McDonnell F2H aircraft, the TV-1s were transferred to reserve squadrons before being phased out of service.

The Museum's TO-1 was accepted by the Navy in September 1948. Throughout the 1950s, it served at Naval Station San Diego (California), Naval Air Station Whiting Field (Florida), NAS Kingsville (Texas), NAS Corpus Christi (Texas), NAS Oakland (California), and finished its career at the Naval Air Reserve Training Unit (NARTU) at Sand Point in Seattle in 1956. It sat derelict for years at Boeing Field, eventually moving to Yakima, Washington before restoration began in the mid-1980s.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Pensacola, Florida.

Registration:
33841 (47-1388)
Wingspan:
38.75ft
Length:
34ft
Height:
11ft
Wing Area:
237.60ft²
Empty Weight:
8,420lbs
Gross Weight:
16,856lbs
Maximum Speed:
594mph
Cruise Speed:
439mph
Range:
1,380miles

The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star series was the first American jet fighter to see combat and exceed 500 mph. Design studies began in early 1943, and Kelly Johnson's team produced a prototype only 143 days later. Engine development in this pioneering, wartime era of jet propulsion delayed first flight of the prototype to January 8, 1944. Numerous technical issues with the airframe and powerplant had to be resolved in the ensuing flight test program.

Plans to deploy P-80s to the Pacific were canceled when the war ended, but the type still became the early frontline jet fighter of the U.S. Air Force in the late 1940s and at the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950. Now designated F-80, it scored the first aerial combat victory by an American jet fighter on June 27, 1950 and the first victory in a jet-to-jet dogfight against a North Korean MiG-15 on November 7, 1950. However, the Shooting Star was generally outclassed by the new MiG and quickly shifted to fighter-bomber missions. A total of 1,732 of these important jets were produced between 1943 and 1950.

In 1947, due to the slow delivery of its own new jet fighters and in order to train new jet pilots, the U.S. Navy obtained the transfer of 50 Lockheed P-80Cs destined to the Air Force. Designated originally as TO-1 and changed to TV-1 in 1950, these planes served as land-based trainer aircraft for Navy squadron VF-52 and U.S. Marine Corps squadron VMF-311. With the arrival of the delayed Grumman F9F and McDonnell F2H aircraft, the TV-1s were transferred to reserve squadrons before being phased out of service.

The Museum's TO-1 was accepted by the Navy in September 1948. Throughout the 1950s, it served at Naval Station San Diego (California), Naval Air Station Whiting Field (Florida), NAS Kingsville (Texas), NAS Corpus Christi (Texas), NAS Oakland (California), and finished its career at the Naval Air Reserve Training Unit (NARTU) at Sand Point in Seattle in 1956. It sat derelict for years at Boeing Field, eventually moving to Yakima, Washington before restoration began in the mid-1980s.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Pensacola, Florida.

Registration:
33841 (47-1388)
Wingspan:
38.75ft
Length:
34ft
Height:
11ft
Wing Area:
237.60ft²
Empty Weight:
8,420lbs
Gross Weight:
16,856lbs
Maximum Speed:
594mph
Cruise Speed:
439mph
Range:
1,380miles