The 415 Ercoupe was designed by Fred Weick of the Engineering and Research Corporation (ERCO) to be an easy-to-fly, affordable, and safe light aircraft. Also easy to maintain, the Ercoupe was targeted at non-professional pilots and was designed to be stall-resistant and spin-proof, with controls that only allowed the aircraft to maneuver in a limited manner. It incorporated novel, simplifying features such as interconnected aileron and rudder control, eliminating the need for rudder pedals. The prototype Model 310 first flew in 1937 and was considerably refined before the production 415C was certified in 1940. Over 100 Ercoupes were produced and delivered before the start of World War II halted production of aircraft for civilian use.

The Ercoupe was the surprising platform for a series of advanced propulsion experiments during the war. U.S. Army Air Corps test pilot Captain Homer A. Boushey, Jr. became the first American to fly under rocket power in an Ercoupe, during a jet-assisted takeoff (JATO) experiment at March Field, California on August 6, 1941. This and follow-on testing paved the way for the formation of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and further JATO developments.

In 1946, production of improved Ercoupes resumed and ERCO produced over 5,000 aircraft before production was again halted in 1952. Beginning in 1955, the Ercoupe design was produced by numerous smaller aircraft companies under several different names, including the Forney F-1 and F1-A, Alon A-2, and Mooney A2-A and M-10. All production of the classic design finally ceased in 1970.

The Museum's Erco 415C Ercoupe was built in 1946 in Hyattsville, Maryland. It was owned for a number of years by C. C. Thompson and was eventually purchased by D & D Flying Service of Port Orchard, Washington. Anselmo Belmondo acquired the Ercoupe in 1959 and donated it to the Museum in 1987. It is currently in storage at the Restoration Center at Paine Field.

Serial Number:
3569
Registration:
N2944H
Wingspan:
30.00ft
Length:
21ft
Height:
6ft
Wing Area:
142.60ft²
Empty Weight:
750lbs
Gross Weight:
1,260lbs
Maximum Speed:
127mph
Cruise Speed:
110mph
Power Plant:
65 h.p. Continental A-65-8 engine
Range:
500miles

The 415 Ercoupe was designed by Fred Weick of the Engineering and Research Corporation (ERCO) to be an easy-to-fly, affordable, and safe light aircraft. Also easy to maintain, the Ercoupe was targeted at non-professional pilots and was designed to be stall-resistant and spin-proof, with controls that only allowed the aircraft to maneuver in a limited manner. It incorporated novel, simplifying features such as interconnected aileron and rudder control, eliminating the need for rudder pedals. The prototype Model 310 first flew in 1937 and was considerably refined before the production 415C was certified in 1940. Over 100 Ercoupes were produced and delivered before the start of World War II halted production of aircraft for civilian use.

The Ercoupe was the surprising platform for a series of advanced propulsion experiments during the war. U.S. Army Air Corps test pilot Captain Homer A. Boushey, Jr. became the first American to fly under rocket power in an Ercoupe, during a jet-assisted takeoff (JATO) experiment at March Field, California on August 6, 1941. This and follow-on testing paved the way for the formation of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and further JATO developments.

In 1946, production of improved Ercoupes resumed and ERCO produced over 5,000 aircraft before production was again halted in 1952. Beginning in 1955, the Ercoupe design was produced by numerous smaller aircraft companies under several different names, including the Forney F-1 and F1-A, Alon A-2, and Mooney A2-A and M-10. All production of the classic design finally ceased in 1970.

The Museum's Erco 415C Ercoupe was built in 1946 in Hyattsville, Maryland. It was owned for a number of years by C. C. Thompson and was eventually purchased by D & D Flying Service of Port Orchard, Washington. Anselmo Belmondo acquired the Ercoupe in 1959 and donated it to the Museum in 1987. It is currently in storage at the Restoration Center at Paine Field.

Serial Number:
3569
Registration:
N2944H
Wingspan:
30.00ft
Length:
21ft
Height:
6ft
Wing Area:
142.60ft²
Empty Weight:
750lbs
Gross Weight:
1,260lbs
Maximum Speed:
127mph
Cruise Speed:
110mph
Power Plant:
65 h.p. Continental A-65-8 engine
Range:
500miles