Republic's immense and powerful P-47 Thunderbolt was one of the truly great fighters of World War II. Designed by Alexander Kartveli, the P-47 was to play a major role in World War II and be built in greater numbers than any other U.S. fighter, including the North American P-51.

In combat, the P-47 was an effective air-to-air fighter -- but it was an even more effective air-to-ground weapon. It had great diving speed and a tremendous payload capacity.

The Museum of Flight's P-47D is a "re-imported" aircraft representing just one of the many Thunderbolts that were sent to Latin American countries as part of post-war military assistance programs.

For a number of years, this P-47D was a gate guardian at the La Paz, Bolivia airport. Doug Champlin later acquired the aircraft from Jim Cullen in 1976 and shipped it off to Dick Martin of Carlsbad, California for a complete rebuild. The latter was completed in 1981. The aircraft was restored in the markings of Colonel Robert Baseler's 325th Fighter Group aircraft (famous for their "checker tail" paint scheme).

Serial Number:
42-8205
Registration:
NX14519
Wingspan:
40.78ft
Length:
36ft
Height:
15ft
Wing Area:
300.00ft²
Empty Weight:
10,000lbs
Gross Weight:
17,500lbs
Maximum Speed:
426mph
Power Plant:
One Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radial engine
Range:
1,800miles

Republic's immense and powerful P-47 Thunderbolt was one of the truly great fighters of World War II. Designed by Alexander Kartveli, the P-47 was to play a major role in World War II and be built in greater numbers than any other U.S. fighter, including the North American P-51.

In combat, the P-47 was an effective air-to-air fighter -- but it was an even more effective air-to-ground weapon. It had great diving speed and a tremendous payload capacity.

The Museum of Flight's P-47D is a "re-imported" aircraft representing just one of the many Thunderbolts that were sent to Latin American countries as part of post-war military assistance programs.

For a number of years, this P-47D was a gate guardian at the La Paz, Bolivia airport. Doug Champlin later acquired the aircraft from Jim Cullen in 1976 and shipped it off to Dick Martin of Carlsbad, California for a complete rebuild. The latter was completed in 1981. The aircraft was restored in the markings of Colonel Robert Baseler's 325th Fighter Group aircraft (famous for their "checker tail" paint scheme).

Serial Number:
42-8205
Registration:
NX14519
Wingspan:
40.78ft
Length:
36ft
Height:
15ft
Wing Area:
300.00ft²
Empty Weight:
10,000lbs
Gross Weight:
17,500lbs
Maximum Speed:
426mph
Power Plant:
One Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radial engine
Range:
1,800miles